Wednesday, November 7, 2012

IWSG: YOUR MOVING STORY


Wow, how time fly's. It's the first Wednesday of the month, and you know what that means! IWSG! 

Started by our brave and fearless Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh, this is our time to share, encourage, cry, scream, and well, get some stuff off our chests. It's also time for some Ninja vibes. We share our ups and downs, but most importantly lend an ear. And frankly, I only need the one anyway. 

In case you missed the link to Alex's name, here it is again: http://alexjcavanaugh.blogspot.ca/p/the-insecure-writers-support-group.html

Click on the link above and you can visit the rest of the Ninjas posts.

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Today I want to share an awesome book with you. If you get a chance to read Tell To Win, by Peter Guber, I hope you do. I've been skimming it mostly for now until I have more time for an in-depth read. But already it's helping.


In short, Mr. Guber is one of Hollywood's elite. Among other things, he's the Chairman & CEO of Mandalay Entertainment, and has produced Rain Man, The Colour Purple, Missing, to name a few.

Despite his many hats, he decided to write a book on telling purposeful stories. If you follow his techniques, he believes you can land the job, get a promotion, move others to action, and on and on. You can learn more about that at his webpage here.


I'd like to narrow the topic and concentrate on how I took his 5 techniques and incorporated it into a winning book reading.

Back in September, I wrote a post about social anxiety disorder, the fear of public speaking and how it affected me physically for up to 24 hours prior to book readings. Since then I've been in search of ways to fight my fear. That's not to say that my audience isn't gracious, or that they even noticed my distress; I'd learned to hide it well. But Peter's Guber's book has given me the tools to experience a fun-filled evening of book reading & sharing.


When I read his 5 points for telling purposefully stories, I understood immediately that I could take those points and enhance my book reading experience.

Here are his 5 techniques:

• Motivation - Get into the state of an authentic state of mind.
• Audience - Hit them in the groin and the wallet. Move them.
• Goal - Build a relationship with your audience so they own your story. (Make it their story)
• Interactive - Pitch & catch. (Give them the only opportunity to participate.
• Content - Write a purposeful story that moves you so you can move your audience. (reader)


Although he's using the term audience as in anyone you happen to talk to, I turned it around to include those sitting in the audience at my book readings. I'd already written a compelling story about a character who moved me. Now I want to share my journey from struggling writer to published author with my audience so it becomes their story too. I've actually done that in an early post called Accepting The Journey pt.3

Most importantly, I had to present my protagonist in a way that my audience could either see themselves in her place or feel themselves loving her.

Because you see, even if many of you are still unpublished, know that it's a necessary step to publication. It's the chicken and the egg. You take all these experiences authors are willing to share, and you make that your story on the road to publication.

Write a purposeful story that will hit your reader in the groin and the wallet. Build a relationship with your reader through your prose so that they believe your story could be their story. They can live it through the pages. Give them a credible story that they believe will change them for the good, leave them feeling better for having read it. And finally give them an experience they'll not soon forget.




62 comments :

  1. Thank you so much for sharing this. I am going to have to get this book after watching these clips.

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  2. Great post-- glad you shared this. I agree with Melissa, the book sounds amazing.

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  3. That sounds like a very inspirational read. I must check out that book. Thanks for the review and heads up!

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  4. Sounds like a great book to benefit from reading. I'm glad you found a way to tackle the reading problem you had.

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    1. Thanks, Miranda. I should confess readings still scare me terribly, but at least now I feel I can go in ready and able.

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  5. I enjoyed reading your Accept The Journey posts. Makes me feel a little better about how long it's taking me to figure out how to write something worth reading. Thanks for the encouragement.

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  6. Live through the pages. And hit them in the wallet! Check.
    Not much on doing readings either...

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    1. I think it can be fun if Peter's right and all we need is to tell a purposeful story. I bet you've got plenty of them, Alex. Thanks!

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  7. Sounds like a great book to guide us through the hard times. Thanks for sharing.

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  8. Thanks for those tips! I just blogged, as part of ISWG, on how I can keep them turning the page. Your tips gave me new insight.

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  9. It does sound like a great book. Thanks for sharing the tips!

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  10. Great topic for IWSG! I used to have a HUGE fear of public speaking. Luckily my mother is a public speaking coach, and she's been working with me for the past 4 years. I still get the nervous twitching before an event, but it's definitely gotten easier and even fun!

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    1. That is so kewl. Think your mum would be interested in adopting me? Or maybe I should adopt her?

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  11. Hi Joylene! Thanks for sharing this book, it looks wonderful. And thanks for coming by my blog, I'm so glad to meet you!

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  12. Telling a story the reader can relate to and feel involved with sounds like good advice.

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  13. Ah yes, putting your protagonist into a place others could see themselves. That is the key. Make the reader ask, what would I do in that situation.

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    1. So true. And so easy really. Hi Nancy. Hope you're all rested up after your big tour. Now for the fun part.

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  14. Thank you very much for joining my blog site! I joined your GFC awhile ago and am so happy to have found you!

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  15. Wow! I'm really interested in checking out that book! I'm going to add it to my reading list and give you credit! Thanks so much for sharing!

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  16. Hi Joylene,

    I needed this. It is gone one in the morning and I cannot sleep. My motivation has been attacked by some worrying forces. With the fragments that remain of my resilience, I take to heart what you have written and the wise words of Peter Guber. The journey encounter potholes. Time to climb out again. Thank you, my kind friend.

    With respect and fulfilling writing, your way, Gary

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    1. You're very welcome, Gary. Happy climbing, eh.

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  17. It's great that his book has been so beneficial for you, and you are absolutely right about keeping the focus on the reader. Our work will be the best we can make it if we remember our sudience. Great IWSG post!

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  18. Thanks for passing this along! That sounds like a great book to read. I need to be paying more attention to helpful writing books. I've only read "On Writing," by Stephen King. I'd like to read something by Donald Maas, as well.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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    1. Honestly, Shannon, every time I read Don Maass' book it fires me up. Thanks for stopping by.

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  19. I'm putting this on my "my read" list. Thanks so much for letting me know about it!

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  20. Ooh, sounds like a great read. I'm going to have to look it up. I LOVED Rain Man, such a profound, poignant story. It did what most stories aim to do--touch the reader deeply.

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    1. So did "Missing". That one was powerful. Thanks for visiting, Adriana!

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  21. This sounds interesting. I think I need to check it out. Thanks for the info. You keep me in the loop! :)

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  22. This sounds like a book worth reading. I like the five techniques.

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  23. I've never heard of Gruber and his book. Thanks for sharing this with us.

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  24. Though I enjoyed giving speeches in high school and college, I only feel comfortable with note cards now. And that's in a room with my friends and family. I understand your anxiety, and I'm glad that the book was so helpful. Julie

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  25. Those 5 tips sound great! There are quite a few really helpful writing books out there, but I've never heard of this one.
    Thanks for sharing.

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    1. If you need more titles, Michelle, let me know. I have a slew of them.

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  26. But I don't like to be hit in the groin. *smile*

    Great post, Joylene. Thanks for sharing the information.

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  27. Glad I clicked over here tonight to soak up this info. I noted in the video how animated and full of energy he was when he presented his talk to the U of Phoenix students. That is powerful too. His enthusiasm keeps an audience interested and believing his words. In my new e-book, Girls Succeed, one of the women profiled was successful in her business, but afraid to speak in front of a group. She hired a coach and gained confidence. I'd never heard of a coach, so just in case...maybe you or some of the commenters here could use one? !! Thanks.

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    1. I took a Toastmaster's class years ago. That helped, but over the years, my confidence had begun to waver. Mr. Guber's book is definitely helping. Thanks, Janet, for dropping by.

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  28. Thanks Joylene for the tips...

    Many authors don't realize how important public speaking is. We ALWAYS need to be ready to pitch our stories in one way or another to anyone who is interested...

    When I get to this point in my journey, I will certainly put these five steps into play...

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  29. Just re-read your last paragraph and have to say I think you've achieved all of them. Next comes the confidence, right?

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  30. Thank you for sharing these tips, Joylene! I have more trouble one-on-one than I do giving a speech in front of a hundred people. Would you believe that?

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    1. Thanks, Carrie! I don't run into a lot of agents, but I'm pretty sure I would be a stuttering fool. But otherwise, I'm sort of okay. I should probably practice in front of the mirror. Or move to Toronto.

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  31. '... but most importantly lend an ear. And frankly, I only need the one anyway.' Love it!

    It sounds a good book, however I personally think we should write more from in the heart, and worry less about what we 'think' our audience wants to read.

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  32. I would rather just write what I'm feeling. It seems like it would be difficult to write for a whole audience. Does his advice work for blog posts too?

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